Moe Touizrar: Sound and meaning

Four Burning Questions

As he tells it, composer Moe Touizrar (Ph.D. 2019) aims to communicate real-world experiences and human emotions through his music. His latest work (composed as a result of winning the 2015-2016 Andrew Svoboda Prize in Orchestral Composition) uses a full orchestra to communicate the experience of watching a sunset and sunrise. We spoke to Touizrar in a recent email exchange to learn more about the piece before its premiere by the McGill Symphony Orchestra this Friday.

The reality of creating a Fall Reading Break at McGill

Entre Nous

At first glance, it seems simple enough; just shift the academic schedule a few days here or a few days there to make room for a much-needed Fall Reading Break. After all, universities in other provinces have successfully created a fall break, as has the Polytechnique here in Montreal. Why should McGill be any different? The McGill Reporter sat down with Ollivier Dyens, Deputy Provost (Student Life and Learning) to find out.

Tal Arbel: Pioneering researcher challenges gender stereotypes

Profile

Tal Arbel is a pioneer in the fields of computer vision and medical image analysis. But, because she is a woman in a field that is traditionally dominated by men, she is often met with resistance. “People are often surprised when I tell them about my profession and say things like ‘You don’t look like an engineer’,” Arbel says. “I am happy to challenge those stereotypes.”

In conversation with Dr. Lewis E. Kay, winner of the Canada Gairdner International Award

Entre Nous

In advance of tonight’s Gairdner National Program Lecture, Dr. Lewis E. Kay talks to the Reporter about nuclear magnetic resonance, the p97 molecule and what it means to win the “baby Nobel.”

Thomas Laqueur on death, immortality and people living to 500

Four Burning Questions

In advance of his upcoming Cundill Prize Lecture, Thomas Laqueur spoke to the Reporter about everything from the possibility of people living for 500 years and the changing definition of death through history.

Maïthéna Girault: Dreams come true with Golden Violin win

Profile

Maïthéna Girault is this year’s winner of the Golden Violin Award, following an exciting public competition held Sunday October 29, in Pollack Hall. “After a long, emotional journey a lot of my dreams are finally coming true,” Girault told the McGill Reporter.

In conversation with the Stratford Festival’s Scott Wentworth

Four Burning Questions

Friends of the McGill Library in collaboration with the Stratford Festival will present the annual Shakespeare Lecture featuring Scott Wentworth on Tuesday, Nov. 7, at 6 p.m. In his talk titled Julius Caesar Before The Rehearsal Room, Wentworth will focus on the director’s work before the first day of rehearsal. Wentworth spoke to the Reporter

Summer in October? What’s up with this gorgeous weather?

Entre Nous

Our cold, wet summer, punctuated by extreme weather events around the world, has given way to one of the warmest, most spectacular autumns in memory. So what’s going on? Are the topsy-turvy forecasts just further proof of climate change due to global warming? The Reporter spoke with Eyad Atallah from the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences to find out.

Infamous medical research: Bad guys, duped victims or something else?

Four Burning Questions

In advance of her Nov. 1 Osler Lecture, Infamous Medical Research: Bad Guys, Duped Victims, or Something Else?, historian Susan M. Reverby looks at two of the most shocking U.S. medical research studies ever conducted.

Patch Adams pulls no punches in pre-Trottier Symposium Q&A

Entre Nous

Patch Adams is one of the keynote speakers at this year’s Trottier Public Science Symposium “Mind Matters: The Body-Mind Connection” (Oct. 23 – 24). In advance of his Oct. 24 lecture, the outspoken Adams takes aim at a wide array of subjects, including medical schools, hospitals and capitalism, in an interview with the Reporter.