Doina Precup to head DeepMind’s new AI lab

Research

DeepMind, the AI company famous for its Go-playing AlphaGo program, announced today that it is opening a new research lab to be headed by Doina Precup, a professor at McGill’s School of Computer Science.

Researcher takes HIV self-testing global

Research

The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and Sympact-X have partnered with IAPAC for the implementation of HIVSmart!™ – a software- and cloud-based application that facilitates HIV self-testing, linkages and retention in care – in high HIV burden worldwide.

Eating protein three times a day could make seniors stronger

Research

Loss of muscle is an inevitable consequence of aging that can lead to frailty, falls or mobility problems. Eating enough protein is one way to remedy it, but it would seem that spreading protein equally among the three daily meals could be linked to greater mass and muscle strength in the elderly.

Pinpointing the origins of autism

Research

The origins of autism remain mysterious. What areas of the brain are involved, and when do the first signs appear? New findings bring us closer to understanding the pathology of autism, and the point at which it begins to take shape in the human brain. Such knowledge will allow earlier interventions in the future and better outcomes for autistic children.

Artificial intelligence predicts dementia before onset of symptoms

Research

Imagine if doctors could determine, many years in advance, who is likely to develop dementia. Such prognostic capabilities would give patients and their families time to plan and manage treatment and care. Thanks to artificial intelligence research conducted at McGill, this kind of predictive power could soon be available to clinicians everywhere.

New research offers hope for faster acting antidepressants

Research

For people suffering from depression, a day without treatment can seem like a lifetime. A new study explains why the most commonly prescribed antidepressants can take as long as six weeks to have an effect. The findings could one day lead to more effective and faster acting drugs.

Brains are more plastic than we thought

Research

Practice might not always make perfect, but it’s essential for learning a sport or a musical instrument. It’s also the basis of brain training, an approach that holds potential as a non-invasive therapy to overcome disabilities caused by neurological disease or trauma.

How a few drops of blood led to a breakthrough in immunology

Research

Scientists from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre may have cracked the code to understanding the function of special cells called regulatory T Cells. The findings could have a major impact in our understanding and treatment of all autoimmune diseases and most chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, Crohn’s disease as well as broader conditions such as asthma, allergies and cancer.

Erasure of negative memories one step closer to reality

Research

A collaborative study by research groups from Columbia University Medical Center and the Montreal Neurological Institute has improved our understanding of memory retention. Their findings could one day lead to therapies that alleviate anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder by selectively erasing pathological memories.

Biofilms – the eradication has begun

Research

Biofilms, the slimy, glue-like membranes that protect microbes from the body’s immune system and increase their resistance to antibiotics, represent one of the biggest threats to patients in hospital settings. But there is good news – a research team led by the RI-MUHC and SickKids in Toronto has developed a novel enzyme technology that prevents the formation of biofilms and can also break them down.