Beyond killing tuberculosis

Research

Historically, our view of host defence against infection was that we must eliminate pathogens to eradicate disease. However, this perspective has recently been challenged as scientists have taken a lesson from plant biologists about an ancient strategy involving the ability to “tolerate” rather than “resist” infection to maintain health.

Early HIV treatment key to avoiding brain atrophy

Research

While the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has largely dropped from news headlines since the 1990s, at the end of 2016 there were 36.7 million people living with the infection, and of those only 53 per cent had access to treatment. A new study underscores the neurological consequences of exposure to HIV without antiretroviral therapy.

Exercise to change the brain

Research

Dr. Marc Roig, an assistant professor in the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, is using high-intensity cardiovascular exercise with Parkinson’s patients to provoke changes in the brain that make it easier to train itself to relearn motor tasks.

Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grants

Research

Female health researchers who applied for grants from Canada’s major health research funder were funded less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, and characteristics of peer reviewers can also affect the result, found a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Low-income HIV patients suffer with healthcare access

Research

Researchers have observed that HIV-infected persons who count on social assistance and other income security programs in Quebec do not have early access to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV and AIDS due to their presumed lower socio-economic status.

Safety concerns over tungsten

Research

New research shows how and where tungsten accumulates in bones of mice exposed to the element through drinking water. The findings, by a team of chemists and biologists at McGill, could add to doubts over the once-universal assumption that tungsten poses little or no health risk to the general human population. 

Time for bed: Bad sleep habits start early in school-age children

Research

Bad sleep habits in children begin earlier than many experts assume. That’s the takeaway from a new study led by McGill researchers. The findings suggest that official sleep guidelines for young school children should be revisited – and that parents ought to maintain firm bedtime rules throughout children’s primary-school years.

Meet RIPK3: Good Cop, Bad Cop, all rolled in one

Research

A team of scientists from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill, led by Immunologist Dr. Maziar Divangahi, have discovered a protein that could soon help minimize the impact of the influenza season and become a critical player in the fight against lung infections.

We’re not addicted to smartphones, we’re addicted to social interaction

Research

Neurobiology of mobile-device habits stems from a healthy human need to socialize, rooted in evolution, McGill researchers find

Unusual lung structures may raise risk of pulmonary disease

Research

The internal anatomy of our lungs is surprisingly variable, and some of those variations are associated with a greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study led by researchers at McGill and the Columbia University Irving Medical Center