October 2011

Kicking off on Friday, October 14, 2011 with the C.P Leblond Celebratory Symposium, this year’s Homecoming events include the Annual Dean’s Reception & Special Medical Seminar on Bringing medicine into the 21st century. Please join us!
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August 2011

It is 1957. Charles Scriver is a resident at the Children’s Medical Center at Harvard. A woman brings in her four-month old daughter who is having seizures that do not respond to epilepsy medication. The distraught woman says tearfully, “It’s happening again.” Read more


August 2011

1957. Charles Scriver est résident au Centre médical pour enfants de Harvard. Une femme se présente avec sa fillette de quatre mois qui fait des crises, mais qui ne réagit pas à la médication contre l’épilepsie. Affolée et en larmes, la dame déclare : « Ça se produit encore. » Son premier enfant avait perdu la vie des suites d’un trouble convulsif mystérieux et elle est inquiète que la deuxième connaisse le même sort. Lire la suite


August 2011

Stem cell research, biological data sharing, personal privacy – just a few hot button issues in genomics. With advances in medicine and technology come new social, legal and ethical challenges. “A lot of it lends itself to fantastical science fiction scenarios,” says Bartha Maria Knoppers, LLB’78, BCL’81, director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy (CGP) at the McGill University and Génome Québec Innovation Centre. “It’s really important to contribute to a more nuanced debate.” Read More


Spring 2011

For the past 15 years, Blair Ford, MDCM’85, has studied the application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Due to tremor, stiffness or slowness, Blair Ford’s patients often have difficulty performing even the simplest tasks, such as picking up a cup of water or writing legibly on a piece of paper. But relief can come with the flip of a switch for some Parkinson’s sufferers. By electrically stimulating selected deep brain structures through implanted electrodes, symptoms of tremor, rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement and walking impairment can be dramatically relieved. Read More


Spring 2011

“Tropical medicine is often associated with parasitic diseases in countries with humid climates and sweltering temperatures,” says Michael Libman, MDCM’85, director of McGill’s Division of Infectious Diseases. “But that’s too simplistic to say. What we explore is […] Read More


Spring 2011

After more than 75 years of success, the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) faces a new set of challenges: a growing elderly population, a “baby boom” in the surrounding neighbourhood, an increasing volume of annual visits to the emergency room, and rapid changes in health care and health care technologies. Read more


Fall 2010

“I can’t wait to see the extraordinary promise unleashed by these new facilities on our quest to become a centre of excellence in personalized medicine,” says Dean Richard I. Levin. “It offers so much in terms of how we can improve the care we give our patients, the learning experience we can offer our students and residents, and the vital research work we will be able to do here to take on and defeat the world’s most serious diseases.” Read more


Fall 2010

There is a palpable passion for family medicine at UMF-Gatineau. Since 1988, when the Unité de Médecine Familiale (Family Medicine Unit) was founded in affiliation with McGill, local doctors and educators have focused on one critical goal: to create more general practitioners. Read more


Fall 2010

“ There are only five practising Aboriginal physicians in Quebec,” says Lauren Hamlin-Douglas, BSc’06, MSc’08. “And while 20 per cent of Canadians live in rural areas, only 10 per cent of doctors practise in those regions.” It was to address these stark realities that McGill’s student-run Regional Initiative was born. The program, which Lauren Hamlin-Douglas […]