Smoke signals


For many of us, wood-burning stoves evoke a cozy nostalgia. They are also one of the top five contributors to global mortality and disease rates.
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Tweeting for a good cause

The Medicine Class of 2016 has set the bar high, raising $10,540 overall for their Senior Class Gift in support of community involvement.
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A pastime away from patients, pills, potions

A craniopharyngioma brain tumour first diagnosed when she was six left Anita Raj, candidate of the Medicine Class of 2017, with a precocious understanding of the endocrine system—and an unusual hobby.
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Black medical students: New association fills gap

Members of the fledgling McGill Black Medical Students’ Association seek black alumni interested in participating in buddy programs and job shadowing.
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Get them started young


Seeing the difference McGill alumni make isn’t hard for Dr. Linda Polka and her Infant Speech Perception lab.
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Med school drama


When Mary Koziol’s grandfather was a medical student in Edinburgh, there were no dissections in anatomy class, only prosections; and there was certainly nothing like S(t)imulation ~ Sex, People & Ideas.
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A spoonful of arts and humanities


A group at the McGill Faculty of Medicine has been exploring medicine’s artistic side and coming up with novel activities in the process.
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Mentorship matters


The Nurse Peer Mentorship Program (NPMP) is changing the way Ingram School of Nursing students confront obstacles.
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Social media and the health care professional: what’s not to like?


Seventeen years. That is how long it takes on average for health research findings to be adopted into widespread clinical practice, common wisdom has it.
For Dr. Susan Rvachew, a speech pathologist specializing in developmental disorders and a professor at McGill’s School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, social media allows her a wider—and faster—reach than traditional modes of publication.
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The future of medicine is very small


You’re ill. You visit a doctor who examines you, diagnoses you with a once deadly cancer, immediately offers some non-invasive treatment, and sends you home with a good prognosis, relatively free of pain and side effects. It’s a scene straight out of Star Trek, but it might not be too far from reality.
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The scale of things

“It’s rare to have fields of science defined by scale,” says Dr. David Juncker, Professor in Biomedical Engineering, but what differentiates micro- and nanotechnology is all a matter of size.
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Microscopic precision

“Most people who have thought about microsurgery think of it as operating with a microscope,” says microsurgeon Rudy Buntic, MDCM’90. “There’s more to it.”
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Calling the shots

We speak to Karen M. Beckermann, MSc(A)’90, Associate Director, Vaccine Preventable Diseases, Toronto Public Health, about refugees, the long reach of Wilson Hall, and why nurses rock.
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A Homecoming primer for young alumni

“I’m not sure that my contemporaries realize that this tradition exists,” mentioned a recent graduate over Homecoming Weekend in October 2015. “I would have liked to have learned more about it as a student.”
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A man of many firsts

Kenneth Melville, BSc’26, MDCM’26, MSc’31, is remembered as the first black medical student at McGill. He was also the first (and only) black Chair of the Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics—and the first person from a developing country to hold a Chair at the University.
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What 40 looks like

Only four out of 110 students in the Medicine Class of 1954 went into family practice, remembered Barry King, MDCM’54, during his 60th anniversary Homecoming celebration. How things have changed! The McGill Department of Family Medicine, founded in 1976, has become the largest in the Faculty, with over 200 residents caring for 100,000 patients across Quebec.
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The moving history of physiotherapy

“If we understand how physiotherapy has developed at McGill and in Canada, we can use these lessons to improve the rehabilitation practices of the future.” These wise words from PhD student Marcos Rodrigues, MSc(PT)’16, are the overarching tenet of an exhibition of antiquated physiotherapy (PT) devices he is helping to prepare for the Maude Abbott Medical Museum.
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How I use social media

Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Specialist Marjorie Dixon, BSc, MDCM’97, whose groundbreaking IVF work has been featured in TIME, shares how (and why) she fits Twitter and Facebook into her busy schedule.
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