Live 2019

A Canadian Cancer Society (CCS)-funded study has found that, unless Canada makes changes, excess weight will become the second leading preventable cause of cancer, following tobacco. Published today by renowned international journal, Preventative Medicine, and conducted by CCS in collaboration with a pan-Canadian team of experts, the ComPARe study is the first study of its kind in Canada and estimates the current and future burden of more than 30 different cancer types due to more than 20 different modifiable cancer risk factors. The ComPARe study revealed that as many as 4 in 10 cancer cases can be prevented.
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Live 2019

A new study, led by researchers at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, set out to settle some of the discrepancies related to brain anatomy and ASD, employing a large dataset to obtain their findings. Their results were published recently in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
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Live 2019

Brain tumours are the leading cause of non-accidental death in children in Canada, but little is known about when these tumours form or how they develop. Researchers from SickKids, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and McGill University, have recently identified the cells that are thought to give rise to certain brain tumours in children and discovered that these cells first appear in the embryonic stage of a mammal’s development – far earlier than they had expected. Their findings, published today in Nature, could lead the way to the discovery of better treatments to attack these lethal tumours.
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Live 2019

Notoriety never mattered to John Souaid until cancer came along. Now, the 78-year-old grandfather of five is filled with optimism following his participation in a cutting-edge global trial involving immunotherapy treatment for lung cancer. Many cancers have the ability to subdue our immune system’s natural ability to recognize and kill mutated cells. Immunotherapy overcomes this spell and allows the body’s own immune system to target and destroy mutated cancer cells. These therapies have shown great promise and were the subject of this year’s Nobel prize.
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Live 2019

Surprisingly complex movements in an important neurotransmitter receptor may help explain the brain’s unpredictable response to drugs, according to a new study. New research from an international team, published this week in the journal Neuron, has revealed that the resting state of signaling proteins are much more dynamic than previously thought.
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Live 2019

An international clinical trial, published in Nature Medicine, revealed that combining RNA and DNA profiling gives a far more precise indication of the active biological elements within a tumor, enabling clinicians to more accurately determine which targeted therapies could improve survival among patients with advanced cancer. This marks the first clinical trial in cancer to add gene expression on top of DNA aberration. The Segal Cancer Centre at the Jewish General Hospital was the only Canadian site in this pioneering effort undertaken by the Worldwide Innovative Networking in Personalized Cancer Medicine, of which the Segal Cancer Centre is a founding member. 
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Live 2019

An open science collection of data from persons at-risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) will help researchers study the pre-symptomatic phase of the disease and accelerate the develop of new therapies that could slow down the disease process.
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Live 2019

Dr. Lan Xiong researches the genetics of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Her main objective is discovering the genes that influence the development of disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. “The genetics (of these diseases) are much more complicated than in other, more mundane neurological disorders,” she says. “But I think in five years we definitely will learn much more about them.”
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Live 2019

Yasser Iturria-Medina became an assistant professor at The Neuro in 2018. He is also an associate member of the Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health and the McConnell Brain Imaging Centre. His focus is combining different sources of information about the brain, including molecular data, and multi-modal brain imaging to explain how the brain works and how to control the progression of neurological disorders.
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Live 2019

Mutations in a gene involved in brain development have led to the discovery of two new neurodevelopmental diseases by an international team led by researchers at McGill University and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center. The first clues about the rare disorder arose after doctors were unable to diagnose why two siblings from Québec City were experiencing seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits. Desperate, the children’s family turned to Carl Ernst at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal for answers.
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