Live 2021

There are no shortage of conspiracy theories relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. But why are people drawn to these theories – even ones that are so far-fetched? What is it about the human psyche that makes us susceptible to embracing – and spreading – these bogus theories? Samuel Veissière answers these questions and more.
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Live 2021

Learn more about the people behind Ubenwa, a team that has developed a fast, easy-to-use mobile app that uses artificial intelligence to analyze the sound of a newborn baby’s cries.
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Live 2021

Exploring the example of Joseph Lister, in his latest paper published in the Bulleting for History of Medicine, Prof. Thomas Schlich explores our varied approaches to discovery and how statistics play into that.
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Live 2021

Canada is at the forefront of global efforts to end child marriage abroad. Yet this practice remains legal and persists across the country. In Canada, more than 3,600 marriage certificates were issued to children, usually girls, under the age of 18 between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study from researchers at McGill University. In recent years, an increasing number of child marriages have been common-law unions.
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Live 2020

Countries worldwide face challenges meeting the growing needs for long-term care services because of high costs. A study led by researchers from McGill University and Université du Québec en Outaouais shows that introducing nurse practitioners can significantly reduce costs and improve patient safety.
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Live 2020

A group of proteins called 4E-BPs, involved in memory formation, is the key to unlocking the antidepressant effect of ketamine in the brain, according to researchers from three Canadian universities. The discovery could lead to better and safer treatments for certain patients suffering from major depression.
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Live 2020

This holiday season will be a lonely one for many people as social distancing due to COVID-19 continues, and it is important to understand how isolation affects our health. A new study shows a sort of signature in the brains of lonely people that make them distinct in fundamental ways, based on variations in the volume of different brain regions as well as based on how those regions communicate with one another across brain networks.
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Live 2020

Researchers at McGill University are hopeful that the identification of the origin and a specific gene needed for tumour growth could lead to new therapeutics to treat a deadly brain cancer that arises in teens and young adults. The discovery relates to a subgroup of glioblastoma, a rare but aggressive form of cancer that typically proves fatal within three years of onset. The findings are published in the latest issue of the journal Cell.
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Live 2020

An international study has found a link between the brain’s network connections and grey matter atrophy caused by certain types of epilepsy, a major step forward in our understanding of the disease. The study, led by researchers from The Neuro, analyzed data from 1,021 individuals with epilepsy and 1,564 healthy controls over 19 sites around the world from the ENIGMA database, a collection of neuroimaging data available to researchers under Open Science principles. They used this data to map grey matter atrophy, a characteristic of epilepsy, in the patients.
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Live 2020

We all know that 14 days of self-isolation is mandatory for healthcare workers and others following unprotected exposure to a confirmed case of COVID-19. But this infection control strategy can put a serious strain on workforce capacity. New research by MI4 (McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity) scientist Benjamin Smith, BSc’01, MCDM’05, MSc’12, is evaluating a shorter infection control strategy.
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