Live 2020

A new insight into cell signals that control cancer growth and migration could help in the search for effective anti-cancer drugs. A McGill-led study reveals key biochemical processes that advance our understanding of colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer among Canadians.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

When does death occur? A new publication co-led by Dr. Sam Shemie, Critical Care Specialist at the Montreal Children’s Hospital and member of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, offers unprecedented consensus on this question of when brain death occurs and how. The article, recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, clearly provides the minimum clinical standards for brain death in adult and children with clear guidance for various clinical situations.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

For decades researchers have known that Alzheimer’s disease causes the atrophy of a system of neurons and synapses highly involved in memory, learning and attention, which is highly dependent on a molecule known as nerve growth factor. The disease causes dysregulation of NGF’s metabolism, leading to the loss of the synapses and neurons that depend on it, akin to plants being deprived of light. A new study led by researchers at McGill University and published recently in Molecular Psychiatry, provides evidence that this dysregulation caused by the Alzheimer’s pathology begins decades before cognitive impairments become detectable.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

Two in three hospitalized seniors are prescribed drugs that should be avoided by older adults, increasing the risk of injury and adverse drug reactions. Improving hospital prescribing practices can reduce the frequency of inappropriate medications and resulting harm, according to a new study led by McGill University researchers.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

Serology testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) will be useful for public health decisions and research but will not have wide application for clinical care, according to a review article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

Bone metastasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with breast cancer. However, current therapeutic approaches against breast cancer induced bone metastasis are mostly palliative and have minimal effect on cancer progression. In a recent paper published in Bone Research, a team of researchers led by Shafaat Rabbani, MD, at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre has presented a novel approach to target both tumour growth and the skeletal lesions caused by breast cancer-induced bone disease.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

Today, Canadian Blood Services and Canada’s COVID-19 Immunity Task Force are releasing initial results of the first 10,000 blood donor samples assessed for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. This analysis reveals that over the period May 9 through June 8, 2020, fewer than 1 per cent of the 10,000 samples from blood donors tested positive for antibodies to the novel coronavirus. Antibodies indicate past infection with SARS-CoV-2, and population studies like this one tell us how many people have likely been exposed to the virus.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

Adult outpatients with mild symptoms of COVID-19 don’t benefit from taking hydroxychloroquine, shows a new study. The results from the second arm of a randomized clinical trial conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and coordinated with a study led by the University of Minnesota are published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

Researchers at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, in collaboration with the StoP-AD Centre, have published a new paper in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, examining how a known genetic risk factor for late-onset  Alzheimer’s disease (AD) influences memory and brain function in cognitively intact older adults with a family history of AD.
Read more ►

 


Live 2020

A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work. The findings, published in Nature by former McGill PhD student Claire Gizowski and Charles Bourque, a professor in McGill’s Department of Neurology-Neurosurgery, are the first to show that injecting mice with a salt solution leads to the activation of neurons associated with the brain’s master circadian clock – the suprachiasmatic nucleus.
Read more ►