Live 2019

What are the impacts of nighttime shift work on gene expression and circadian rhythms? Laura Kervezee from Drs. Diane Boivin and Dr. Nicolas Cermakian’s team at the Douglas Research Center in Montreal, presents the results of their recent study published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS).
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Live 2019

Researchers at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine have made important strides in understanding the functioning of enzymes that play an integral role in the production of antibiotics and other therapeutics. Their findings are published in Science.
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Live 2019

How can artificial intelligence help detect the early decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease earlier? Nikhil Bhagwat from Dr. Mallar Chakravarty’s team at the Douglas Research Centre in Montreal, shows how they managed to develop this novel approach. This discovery was published in the journal PLOS ONE.
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Live 2019

Approximately 15 to 20% of breast cancers are caused by changes in a gene known as HER2, which cause the protein produced by the gene to become constantly active, leading to uncontrolled cell growth. Cancers with these genetic changes are called “HER2-positive” or “HER2+” breast cancers. While therapies that interfere with the HER2 protein can be very effective in many of these cases they don’t work for everyone. When they fail, the prognosis for those with the disease is extremely poor. For these people, there is a dire need to understand why they are resistant to the treatment and to develop new strategies to attack the cancer cells. Now, researchers at McGill University’s Goodman Cancer Research Centre (GCRC) believe they have identified a way to do this, increasing the vulnerability of cancer cells to an approved therapy. Their results were recently published in Cell Reports.
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Live 2019

Obesity rates have tripled since 1975, according to the World Health Organization. While the loss of control some people experience due to food leads some researchers to blame obesity on food addiction, others point out that food is a basic need and does not have addictive molecules, like nicotine or caffeine. This debate inspired a research team led by Dr. Alain Dagher at The Neuro to look for ways to measure the behavioural similarities and differences that obesity has with addictive behaviours, as well as psychiatric disorders.
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Live 2019

An associate professor of psychiatry at McGill, Gruber says there are now plenty of studies that point to sleep deficits among children and adolescents. In fact, she has been at the forefront of research in this area. Gruber’s work has highlighted the importance of good sleep for young people.
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Live 2019

A new open science software app developed by my colleagues and I will help neuroscientists analyze, visualize and report on ever-increasing volumes of data, for free. Brainstorm was born out of this idea, initially to serve the vast and diverse community of researchers and students interested in applying imaging techniques to electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG, MEG). Fast forward to today, and Brainstorm now has 24,400 registered user accounts worldwide and has produced approximately 1,200 research articles, many in leading publications such as ScienceNeuron, and Nature Neuroscience.
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Live 2019

A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut, developed by researchers in Kyoto, Japan, and Montreal, Canada, reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases without the need of patient samples. This combination, which can be read about in Nature Communications, will make it much easier to study diseases even when patients are rare or unavailable. 
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Live 2019

A recent study, published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery led by Dr. Stephanie Thibaudeau, Assistant Professor of Surgery at McGill University, and Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Program Director at the McGill University Health Centre, puts forward the notion that non-biologic simulators could prove to be a better alternative when it comes to training future surgeons.
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Live 2019

Developing an effective treatment using antisense therapy for vision loss in Usher – a rare genetic disease characterized by concurrent hearing and vision loss – is the long-term goal of a research project led by Jennifer J. Lentz, PhD, Associate Professor at LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence and Departments of Otorhinolaryngology, Genetics and Ophthalmology in collaboration with Dr. Robert K. Koenekoop, Professor in the Departments of Pediatric Surgery and Ophthalmology at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and  Senior Scientist at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. This project was awarded a $1.74 million USD five-year grant by the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health.
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