Live 2018

Proteins found in blood provide scientists and clinicians with key information on our health. These biological markers can determine if a chest pain is caused by a cardiac event or if a patient has cancer. Now, PhD candidate Milad Dagher, Professor David Juncker and colleagues in McGill’s Department of Biomedical Engineering have devised a technique that can detect hundreds of proteins with a single blood sample.
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Live 2018

Researchers assessed data from over half a million people in 57 countries who played a specially-designed mobile game, which has been developed to aid understanding into spatial navigation, a key indicator in Alzheimer’s disease. The study was conducted by researchers across the world including, Véronique Bohbot, Researcher at the Douglas Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill, who has collected data from over four million people who have played Sea Hero Quest.
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Live 2018

New research published in Nature Communications suggests that genetic or pharmacological targeting of the epigenetic modifier Ezh2 dramatically hinders metastatic behaviour in the Luminal B breast cancer subtype. The discovery was made by a team lead by William Muller, PhD, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and member of the Goodman Cancer Research Centre at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and Alison Hirukawa, a recent PhD student in Dr. Muller’s lab.
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Live 2018

Treatment of latent tuberculosis is set to transform after a pair of studies from the Research-Institute of the McGill University Health Centre revealed that a shorter treatment was safer and more effective in children and adults compared to the current standard. These findings are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Live 2018

Amongst the 25,000 people infected by Hepatitis C in Montreal, 25% do not know that they are sick. Though there is no vaccine to protect us, there is a new “revolutionary” treatment available, according to Dr. Karl Weiss.
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Live 2018

A new type of “lab on a chip” developed by McGill University scientists has the potential to become a clinical tool capable of detecting very small quantities of disease-causing bacteria in just minutes. The device designed by Sara Mahshid, Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at McGill, is made of nano-sized “islands,” about one tenth of the thickness of a single human hair, which act as bacterial traps or snares.
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Live 2018

The immune system can be an important ally in the fight against cancer. A study from McGill scientists published today in Science suggests that the reverse may also be true – that abnormal inflammation triggered by the immune system may underlie the development of stomach tumours in patients with a hereditary cancer syndrome known as Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS).
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Live 2018

Most early deaths in trauma patients result from hemorrhaging, so it’s vital that surgeons race to locate and stop it. A new balloon catheter which quickly stops internal bleeding caused by pelvic fractures is leading a revolution in emergency bleeding control, and it’s now available in Canada. A trauma team at the Montreal General Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre (MGH-MUHC) recently used it to save two patients with life-threatening hemorrhage.
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Live 2018

Personalized medicine – delivering therapies specially tailored to a patient’s unique physiology – has been a goal of researchers and doctors for a long time. New research provides a way of delivering personalized treatments to patients with neurological disease.
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Live 2018

If you want to learn to walk a tightrope, it’s a good idea to go for a short run after each practice session. That’s because a recent study in NeuroImage demonstrates that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new motor skill improves its long-term retention. More specifically, the research shows, for the first time, that as little as a single fifteen-minute bout of cardiovascular exercise increases brain connectivity and efficiency. It’s a discovery that could, in principle, accelerate recovery of motor skills in patients who have suffered a stroke or who face mobility problems following an injury.
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