Live 2019

Lung function normally declines as we age, but a new study carried out by researchers from Canada, Switzerland, and the UK, suggests that air pollution may contribute to this process and adds to the evidence that breathing in polluted air harms the lungs and increases the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. “While we know ambient air pollution increases the risk of respiratory mortality, evidence for impacts on lung function and COPD is less well established,” says Dany Doiron, a research associate working with Isabel Fortier, PhD, at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and lead author on the study.
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Live 2019

A new collaborative study, led by researchers at McGill University’s Goodman Cancer Research Centre (GCRC), and published in the journal Molecular Cell, uncovered novel functions for polycistronic microRNAs and showed how cancers such as lymphoma twist these functions to reorganize the information networks that control gene expression.
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Live 2019

Researchers at McGill University focusing on the intellectual disability aspect of Christianson Syndrome, have shown for the first time how a specific mutant form of the SLC9A6 encoding gene for the NHE6 protein affects the ability of neurons to form and strengthen connections. The findings, which the researchers hope could eventually lead to new treatments for patients, are published online in the journal Neurobiology of Disease.
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Live April 2019

Scientists have found a correlation between a disease involving chronic pain and alterations in the gut microbiome. In a paper published today in the journal Pain, a Montreal-based research team has shown, for the first time, that there are alterations in the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of people with fibromyalgia. Approximately 20 different species of bacteria were found in either greater or are lesser quantities in the microbiomes of participants suffering from the disease than in the healthy control group.
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Live 2019

An international team spearheaded by researchers at McGill University has discovered a biological mechanism that could explain heightened somatic awareness, a condition where patients experience physical discomforts for which there is no physiological explanation.
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Live 2019

Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended by the World Health Organization for the first six months of life because of the benefits for both mom and baby. In Canada, approximately 32% of women meet this recommendation. McGill University researchers Kristin Horsley, Tuong-Vi Nguyen, Blaine Ditto, and Deborah Da Costa from the Departments of Psychology and Medicine examined whether pregnancy-specific anxiety – worries or concerns related specifically to pregnancy and post-partum – might play a role in how long a woman exclusively breastfeeds her child.
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Live 2019

The first research chair in Quebec focused on women’s cardiac health, propelled by Heart & Stroke and McGill University, will officially be launched on July 1 via a research project led by Dr. Natalie Dayan, Assistant Professor of Medicine at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and Director of Obstetrical Medicine in the division of General Internal Medicine at the McGill University Health Centre.
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Live 2019

Gary Armstrong, a scientist at The Neuro, is helping solve one of the mysteries that have made amyotrophic lateral sclerosis such a challenging subject of research and treatment.
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Live 2019

A new brain imaging scanner will enable researchers to ‘see’ into the brain with unprecedented detail. Thanks to a generous $3 million donation from the Courtois Foundation, The Neuro‘s McConnell Brain Imaging Centre will be the world’s first R&D centre for a revolutionary new technology that will significantly advance brain research and understanding of neurological diseases.
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Live 2019

Surgery is the only way to stop seizures in 30 per cent of patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy. A new study finds that inducing seizures before surgery may be a convenient and cost-effective way to determine the brain region where seizures are coming from.
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