Live 2018

The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity. New research on the hormone ghrelin was published on Dec. 4, 2018, led by Dr. Alain Dagher’s lab at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University.
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Live 2018

CHILD-BRIGHT is focused on supporting the rights of some of Canada’s most vulnerable citizens – children with brain-based developmental disabilities. For research to make a difference, the findings need to be delivered to people who can use them, and in a format that makes them easy to understand and apply. One example is Jooay, a free mobile and web app that helps children with disabilities and their families locate leisure opportunities close to where they are. The app contains a database of arts, sports, camps, and other leisure programs across the country. Dr. Keiko Shikako-Thomas and Dr. Majnemer created Jooay in collaboration with parents, rehabilitation professionals, policy makers, physical education teachers, and community partners.
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Live 2018

There are only 25 people in the whole of Quebec at the moment who have a rare recessive genetic disease called chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia (CAID). It is a serious disease that affects both heart rate and intestinal movements. A McGill-led research team has been able to trace the gene mutations underlying the disease back to two European founding families who arrived in the province in the 17th century.
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Live 2018

How does cancer spread? While studying human brain tumour cells, a team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre found some answers to this crucial, yet so far unanswered question. They looked at a gene called EGFRvIII, which is present in patients with glioblastoma – a highly aggressive form of brain cancer that spreads quickly and that is difficult to treat.
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Live 2018

A team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) led by Dr. Donald Vinh, the RI’s so-called “Dr. House” because of his research into rare diseases, has discovered a new human disease and the gene responsible for it, paving the way for the proper diagnosis of patients globally and the development of new therapies. Their findings are published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.
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Live 2018

Point-Of-Care Testing (POCT) technologies have revolutionized testing for many infectious diseases by providing a much faster access to test results, allowing for rapid results and—where integrated in clinical settings—help expedite clinical decision making. Dr. Nitika Pant Pai emphasized the importance of POCT for expanded access, rapid clinical decision making for all key infectious diseases (HIV, STDs, NTDs, tuberculosis) and also for antimicrobial resistance detection and surveillance globally.
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Live 2018

HIV self-testing strategies have been recommended by the World Health Organization since 2016, as they empower people to find out HIV their status at their convenience. Home-based testing kits have yet to be approved for sale in Canada. However, a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and collaborators from Clinique Médicale l’Actuel, in Montreal, evaluated an unsupervised HIV self-testing program via a smartphone and tablet application called HIVSmart!, among an at-risk population (men who have sex with men).  The findings of their study – a Canada-first – have been published online this week in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.
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Live 2018

A new study has drawn a direct link between the amount of stigma men with HIV report experiencing and their scores on cognitive tests, measuring abilities such as memory and attention. The study, by researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, and the McGill University Health Centre tested 512 older Caucasian men living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), drawn from clinics across Canada and part of the Positive Brain Health Now cohort.
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Live 2018

A new paper published by McGill University researchers in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that some clinical trials may promote the use of ineffective and costly treatments. That’s the opposite of what clinical trials are aimed at, namely preventing ineffective and costly treatments from being taken up by physicians and patients. 
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Live 2018

A researcher from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital is one of eight scientists to receive a grant this year from the ALS Society of Canada. Gary Armstrong, who joined The Neuro in 2017, is furthering our understanding of synaptic defects arising both at peripheral neuromuscular junctions and central spinal cord synapses in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis using zebrafish models. Congratulations Dr. Gary Armstrong!
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