Live 2020

A second cohort of medical students and residents recently completed an elective called Foundations in Medical and Health Sciences Education, developing curriculum proposals around environmental health, competency-based medical education, and the language of care in chronic illness. Offered through McGill University’s Institute for Health Sciences Education, the four-week elective was launched by Institute Faculty Members Dr. Stuart Lubarsky and Dr. Robert Sternszus in 2018 as a means of introducing students and residents to health sciences education by having them develop evidence-based curricula with real-world potential.
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Live 2020

Epigenetic clocks are a new type of biological test currently capturing the attention of the scientific community, private companies and governmental agencies because of their potential to reveal an individual’s “true” age. Recently, the Kobor Lab developed the first pediatric epigenetic clock designed specifically for testing the age of young people, with an eye towards its applications in research and medical settings. But pediatric epigenetic clocks are likely to have non-medical applications as well. They could soon be used in immigration cases to prove the age of undocumented migrants seeking asylum as minors. Other future uses can be imagined, such as for child labour and trafficking surveillance, or even for the identification of child combatants in armed conflicts.
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Live 2020

Registration is now open as the first in a series of computational medicine workshops launches on Friday, February 28, with workshops taking place into April on a range of emerging topics and skills. Seating is still available in some of the workshops so check out the details and register now. The series is primarily designed for students, postdoctoral fellows, medical residents, research assistants and faculty members in the Faculty of Medicine, but organizers say the workshops are open and interdisciplinary.
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Live 2020

Earlier today, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council announced the results of the competition for the Canada-UK Artificial Intelligence Initiative, and three McGill teams were among the selected projects. “For three McGill projects to be chosen in this highly competitive initiative highlights the expertise and quality of our AI research,” said Martha Crago, Vice-Principal, Research and Innovation. “Thank you to the SSHRC, NSERC and CIHR for their significant investment in these projects, and congratulations to all the professors, and their respective teams.”
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Live 2020

The McGill University School of Physical & Occupational Therapy is delighted to announce the launch of the Manipal-McGill Rehabilitation Collaboration (MMRC) between the Manipal Academy of Higher Education’s College of Health Professions (Manipal, India) and the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy (SPOT) of McGill University, Faculty of Medicine (Montreal, Canada).
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Live 2020

Another day, another honour for Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. On February 18, everybody’s favourite Super Bowl-winning doctor received a standing ovation as he was awarded the Medal of Honour at the National Assembly. An emotional Duvernay-Tardif put his hand on his heart and pointed to friends and family during the ceremony, clearly moved by the warm reception. “I am proud to represent you, to represent Quebec,” said a beaming Duvernay-Tardif. “I am extremely honoured. It is very touching.”
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Live 2020

Richard and Satoko Ingram of the Newton Foundation have announced a $1.1 million donation to the Montreal General Hospital Foundation in support of VOICE: Views On Interdisciplinary Childhood Ethics, a cross-institutional initiative based at McGill’s Ingram School of Nursing. VOICE brings together an interdisciplinary team of researchers, students and community partners, which has been working for over a decade to promote respect for children’s rights and to address ethical concerns in children’s lives.
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Live 2020

Nurses are uniquely positioned to have an impact on the quality of patient care. In oncology in particular, nurses not only provide patients with complex medical care, they also offer crucial psychosocial support and education at a difficult time in patients’ lives. Studies have shown that increased nursing specialty certification is associated with improved patient outcomes and decreased adverse events in acute care settings. The Rossy Cancer Network felt that nursing certification was an important avenue to pursue in order to support its goal of improving the quality of care for individuals with cancer at McGill-affiliated hospitals (including the McGill University Health Centre, the Jewish General Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital Center).
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Live 2020

Researchers at the Montreal Children’s Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre – the Children’s – and the CHU Sainte-Justine are coming together within the scope of two new projects, funded under the auspices of the McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity (MI4): improving the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial pneumonia and better understanding rare immune disorders.
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Live 2020

Taking care of a loved one who is suffering from Alzheimer’s can be overwhelming. It’s a long and complicated disease that can leave patients and their loved ones frustrated if they don’t get the education and support needed to help them prepare for the changes to come. There is also a stigma associated with dementia-related illnesses that may prevent family members from reaching out and asking for the help they need. McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine is working to change that by offering monthly dementia education workshops designed to provide family caregivers with a solid understanding of the progression of the disease and its behavioural and psychological symptoms.
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