Science Students: A Special Ranking

Winter 2010
Willard Boyle (left), BSc’47. MSc’48, PhD’50, 2009 Nobel Prize for Physics, and Jack Szostak, BSc’72, 2009 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

Willard Boyle (left), BSc’47. MSc’48, PhD’50, 2009 Nobel Prize for Physics, and Jack Szostak, BSc’72, 2009 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

For the sixth year in a row, McGill placed among the top 25 in the prestigious Times Higher Education-QS world university rankings in 2009. The only Canadian school in that elite group, McGill took the 18th spot. While the world rankings don’t provide further classification, McGill’s Faculty of Science, in particular, holds a special place among the world’s very best.

There are many reasons for our rock-steady reputation: to begin with, we have  young and dedicated faculty, supported by first-rate administrative staff. But the Faculty’s greatest asset is our truly outstanding students.

For almost two centuries now, our undergraduates have been consistently exceptional. Our students have the highest entrance grades of any other institution in Canada, and while they are studying here, our undergraduates engage in research and are challenged to measure themselves against the best the world has to offer.

This year, the strength of our students was tested and given top honours by two separate Nobel Prize committees: the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, who awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics to Willard Boyle, BSc’47, MSc’48, PhD’50 and the Karolinska Institute, which awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Medicine to Jack Szostak, BSc’72.

In this issue of Team Science Today, we not only pay tribute to Boyle and Szostak but all Science students and alumni. The Nobels recognize two very exceptional and gifted scientists. But the honour is shared among all students, past and present, of the Faculty of Science. They are deserving of our deepest support.

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