Greetings from the Dean

B Lennox 2Welcome to Alumni Corner! You’ve reached a space designed especially for Faculty of Science alumni like you.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Science alumni share their experiences with students at special career day

Career Day 1 small cropped np
Science alumni are returning to McGill to share their experiences, insights and career advice with students. Hearing from alumni who have successfully “made their way” can be a huge help to science students preparing for today’s challenging work environment.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Alumnus and Nobel Prize winner honoured at reception

JO2 small 2 npDr. John O’Keefe, McGill alumnus and Nobel Laureate, recently delivered a special ‪Hebb Lecture‬‬ and attended a lunch reception in his honour.

Read More Posts From This Section »

The tragedy of war commemorated in stained glass

stained glass front page fpOne hundred years ago, a McGill professor and physician wrote the poem that helped define World War One. The poem was In Flanders Fields, and its author, Dr. John McCrae, taught at McGill, and practiced at the Montreal General Hospital and Royal Victoria Hospital.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Interview: Dr. Donald Taylor

TG Taylor crop 2 Donald M. Taylor is Professor of Psychology with the Faculty of Science. His research interests include laboratory and field research in the area of intergroup relations.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Did you know…?

Here are a few trivia questions to test your wits. The answers can be found in this newsletter. Take a moment to respond, and then check the answers page to see how you did.
stem-cells np

1) Stem cell therapy – a form of treatment made possible by the 1953 discovery of stem cells by McGill researchers – was recently used to treat what hockey legend?
2) What is the name of the famous World War One poem written by Dr. John McCrae, physician, poet and McGill professor?
3) The world’s first commercial rooftop greenhouse is located in what Canadian city?
4) In what decade of the 20th Century was “Green Chemistry” born?

Read More Posts From This Section »

Try this at home: Make your own “bubbling cauldron”

kid's corner cauldronFor young (and young-at-heart) scientists, here is a simple science experiment developed by McGill science students as part of the WOW Lab project.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Then and now – the Otto Maass Chemistry Building

OM bldgStudents and visitors to McGill’s downtown campus in the early 1960s will remember a massive building site at the corner of Sherbrooke and University Avenue – the new Otto Maass Chemisty Building was under construction.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Beyond BUGS—life after a biochemistry degree, Part I

Paul Farkas Rami Hanna student Alex Magder retouched small npAt a recent event sponsored by McGill’s Biochemistry Undergraduate Society (BUGS), McGill biochemistry graduates shared their post-graduation experiences with an audience of undergraduates. The presentations engendered a unique feeling of community, because despite the very different paths taken by the speakers, they all had started in the same way: with a BSc in Biochemistry from McGill.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Biochemistry degree + open mind = totally unexpected, cool career

lauren rathmell 4She didn’t study biochemistry to become a farmer or an entrepreneur – but that’s how it turned out. After graduating from McGill in 2010 with a degree in biochemistry, Lauren Rathmell helped found Lufa Farms, a hugely innovative venture that grows food year-round in urban rooftop greenhouses. Today, she serves as Lufa Farms’ greenhouse director, overseeing operations, managing cultivation, crop planting, research and development.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Green chemistry promises better, safer, more affordable products

Better living through (green) chemistry! It’s a slogan whose time may have come. Although chemistry has provided countless benefits over the years, its public image has suffered in recent decades because of perceived links to environmental problems. Now, with the advent of green chemistry, the tide is turning.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Studying the structures of living things

iStock_000024159220 smallOne of the University’s oldest departments, with almost 15 percent of the Faculty of Science’s undergraduate enrolment, McGill’s Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (ACB) is constantly evolving to keep pace with the relentless advance of biology and medicine.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Lasting tributes to two sisters

Sue and Celia (1)Memorial gifts to McGill are a special and lasting way to commemorate loved ones and celebrate their connections to the University. In the case of the Hendler family, two awards have been created at McGill to honor the memory of alumna Celia Hendler, BA’80 and her sister Sue.

Read More Posts From This Section »

Tools to investigate the tiny – nanoscience comes of age

IMG_0049sEvery science needs the right tools to move it forward. For astronomy, the crucial tool was the telescope, for biology, the microscope. Now, nanoscience — the science of the very, very small – is coming of age, thanks in part to tools developed at the McGill Nanotools Microfabrication Lab (MNM).

Read More Posts From This Section »