Cheryl Suzack on reparatory justice, human rights and Indigenous feminism

Four Burning Questions

On Monday, March 31, 2014 Visiting Eakin Fellow Cheryl Suzack (Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto), will join N. Bruce Duthu (Samson Occom Professor and Chair of Native American Studies, Dartmouth College), to deliver the 2014 Eakin Lecture, Discussing Indigenous Agency.

“It’s arguable that we now live in a dictatorship, punctuated by manipulated elections,” says Elizabeth May.

Four Burning Questions

“It’s arguable that we now live in a dictatorship, punctuated by manipulated elections,” says Elizabeth May, leader of the Federal Green Party. May will discuss what can be done to prevent a slide into “elected dictatorships” during her March 24 lecture titled “The Crisis in Democracy”

Leith Sharp: Embracing “disruptive sustainability”

Four Burning Questions

Leith Sharp has more than 18 years of experience greening universities, first at the University of New South Wales, where she earned her undergraduate degree in environmental engineering, then at Harvard, where she was the founding director of the school’s Green Campus Initiative in 1999. As director, Sharp built the largest green campus organization in the world. For her Feb. 27 lecture, Sharp will discuss lessons learned from the Harvard green building case study, along with other leading organizations, and explore how sustainability can be an innovation driver to transform the 21st century university.

Myra Giberovitch: Developing recovery programs for survivors of mass atrocities

Four Burning Questions

With more than 25 years of experience practicing gerontological social work, Myra Giberovitch specializes in developing services and programs for survivors of mass atrocity crimes such as the Holocaust. Her most recent book describes a strengths-based practice philosophy that guides the reader in how to understand the survivor experience, develop service models and programs, and employ individual and group interventions to empower survivors. The book is essential reading for anyone who studies, interacts, lives or works with survivors of mass atrocity.

Four Burning Questions for Professor T.V. Paul

Four Burning Questions

T.V. Paul is co-founder of the McGill University-Université de Montréal Centre for International Peace and Security Studies (CIPSS). A James McGill Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science, Paul has been teaching at McGill since 1991. A specialist in International Relations, especially international security, regional security and South Asia, Paul is kicking off the year with the publication of a new book focused on Pakistan and its “geostrategic curse.” A book launch is planned at the McGill Bookstore on Jan. 30.

Four Burning Questions for John Robinson, Associate Provost, Sustainability at UBC

Four Burning Questions

On Jan. 24, John Robinson, Associate Provost, Sustainability at the University of British Columbia will be at McGill to discuss UBC’s innovative Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS), including the design goals of the CIRS, the research program, its performance and the challenges faced in its creation.

Four Burning Question for Douglas Farrow, Kennedy Smith Chair in Catholic Studies

Four Burning Questions

Douglas Farrow is professor of Christian Thought in the Faculty of Religious Studies, project director for Pluralism, Religion and Public Policy, and the newly appointed Kennedy Smith Chair in Catholic Studies in the Faculty of Arts. He is giving his inaugural lecture in the latter role at 7 p.m. on Jan. 22. Recently, Farrow took the time to talk to the Reporter about the Chair, the upcoming lecture, the relationship between church and state, and Catholic Studies at McGill.

Four Burning Questions for Christopher Clark, finalist for the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature

Four Burning Questions

Christopher Clark is a professor of modern European history and a fellow of St. Catherine’s College at the University of Cambridge, U.K. Clark has been selected as a finalist for the Cundill Prize for Historical Literature for The Sleepwalkers : How Europe Went to War in 1914. Clark talks to the Reporter about writing, WWI and what winning the Cundill Prize would mean for his work.

Four Burning Questions for Fredrik Logevall, finalist for the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature

Four Burning Questions

Fredrik Logevall is a Swedish-American historian and professor of International Studies at Cornell University. Logevall received the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History for his book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam, which has also been selected as a finalist for the Cundill Prize for Historical Literature. Logevall recently spoke to the McGill Reporter about his book, his writing regime and the importance of literary prizes.

Seana McKenna: My life with Shakespeare

Four Burning Questions

Seana McKenna is considered by many to be Canada’s finest dramatic actress of her generation. Friends of the McGill Library in collaboration with the Stratford Festival present the Annual Shakespeare Lecture featuring McKenna on Tuesday, Nov. 12.