Stem cell transplants, a potential cure for life-threatening diseases

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A stem cell transplant is a procedure that can treat or cure a number of conditions: bone marrow diseases, inherited immune disorders, hemoglobinopathies and some types of cancer. Dr. Gizelle Popradi, hematologist and director of the Stem Cell Transplant Program of the McGill University Health Centre tells us more about this life-saving therapy and its use in the treatment of cancer patients.

Les cellules souches, de précieuses alliées

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Une greffe de cellules souches est une intervention qui peut traiter ou guérir diverses maladies : des maladies de la moelle osseuse, des hémoglobinopathies (anomalies des globules rouges) et des troubles immunitaires congénitaux, de même que certains types de cancer, tels que les leucémies, les lymphomes et les myélomes. La Dre Gizelle Popradi, hématologiste et directrice du programme de greffe de cellules souches du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (CUSM), nous en dit un peu plus sur ce traitement salvateur et sur son usage pour soigner les patients atteints d’un cancer.

Donald Taylor: Fuelled by folk music and nuclear physics

Profile

McGill Medal winner, Donald Taylor looks back at a long and distinguished career championing some of the world’s most disadvantaged people.

John Bergeron: “Only young people make discoveries”

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Recently, McGill’s John Bergeron, one of Canada’s preeminent cell biologists, was invited to be a judge at the Canada-Wide Science Festival (CWSF). Bergeron jump at the chance because it closed a circle over 50 years in the making. “The CWSF started my career at McGill,” says Bergeron. “In 1961, I won the Science Fair at the University of Montreal and that paid for my first year of McGill.”

Philip Branton: More funding for basic science

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Philip Branton knows a lot about cancer. Branton, the Gilman Cheney Professor at the Department of Oncology and Biochemistry is an internationally renowned virologist with over 40 years of cancer research experience. But, if Branton has learned anything over the course of his long, distinguished career it is that “there is still so much we just don’t understand about cancer.”

Profile: Robert Platt, Chair in Pharmacoepidemiology

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A native of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Dr. Robert Platt, Professor in the departments of Pediatrics and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, and the inaugural Albert Boehringer (1st) Chair in Pharmacoepidemiology, has long been fascinated with numbers.

Staff profile: David Nguyen, Senior Grants and Agreements Officer

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One of McGill’s strategic goals is to continue to grow its research funding from outside agencies, and David Nguyen is part of the team working tirelessly to realize this goal. As a Senior Grants and Agreements Officer, Nguyen works on matching McGill researchers with large-scale grants and partnerships, usually involving multiple stakeholders on all sides.

Lorsque les soins palliatifs inspirent la vie

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Vêtu de son traditionnel gilet bleu, Jean-Pierre Fournier arrive chaque mardi à l’unité de soins palliatifs de l’Hôpital Royal Victoria du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (RVH-CUSM). Depuis les 13 dernières années, l’homme de 65 ans est fidèle au service de bénévolat de l’hôpital.

Not all fun and games

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Dr. Jeff Wiseman, an Internal Medicine physician at the Royal Victoria Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre is currently developing a serious medical smartphone-based game called The Deteriorating Patient with the aim of helping medical students learn how to stabilize severely ill patients when on call.

Les jeux sérieux aident sérieusement l’enseignement de la médecine

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Le Dr Jeff Wiseman, interniste à l’Hôpital Royal Victoria du Centre universitaire de santé McGill est à préparer un jeu médical sérieux pour téléphone intelligent, appelé Deteriorating Patient, afin de contribuer à l’apprentissage des étudiants en médecine qui doivent apprendre à stabiliser des patients gravement malades lorsqu’ils sont sur appel.