Researchers land $3.5-million DFAT grant to improve health and agriculture in Ghana

Research and Discovery

A team led by Prof. Grace Marquis, of McGill University’s School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, will receive a grant of close to $3.5 million for an innovative project aimed at improving the health and household food security of infants and children in southeastern Ghana’s Upper Manya Krobo district. The funding was announced today by Senator Larry Smith, on behalf of the Honourable Christian Paradis, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, at an event held at McGill’s Macdonald Campus, in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue.

Odds that global warming is due to natural factors: slim to none

Research and Discovery

An analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth’s climate, according to a new study by McGill physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

Should whole-genome sequencing become part of newborn screening?

Research and Discovery

Whole-genome sequencing programs for newborbs – which involve drawing a few drops of blood from a newborn’s heel – have been in place since the late 1960s, and are credited with having saved thousands of lives by identifying certain disorders that can be treated effectively when caught early enough. As the technology is becoming increasingly affordable and reliable, researchers at McGill say making whole-genome sequencing part of routine screening programs for newborns raises ethical, legal and social issues that should be weighed carefully.

Plugged in but powered down

Research and Discovery

Young men who have suffered from depression early in life are more vulnerable than women to spending many hours in front of a screen later on in life.

Is there life on Mars? McGill researcher on team to find out

Research and Discovery

Unlike many winter-weary Montrealers, microbiologist Lyle Whyte isn’t one to complain about frigid climes, having conducted the bulk of his research up at McGill’s High Arctic Station for the past 14 years. In fact, his wealth of experience working in extreme cold temperatures recently helped him land a spot on an elite team of scientists handpicked by the European Space Agency (ESA) to work on the ambitious ExoMars 2018 project, specifically as a member of the Landing Site Selection Working Group. The mission? To find life on Mars.

New evidence confirms link between IQ and brain cortex

Research and Discovery

Rate of change in the thickness of the brain’s cortex is an important factor associated with a person’s change in IQ, according to a collaborative study by scientists in five countries including researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro – McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. The study has potentially wide-ranging implications for the pedagogical world and for judicial cases in which the defendant’s IQ score could play a role in determining the severity of the sentence.

Tracking neighbourhood eating habits to promote healthier diets

Research and Discovery

Public health physician David Buckeridge uses checkout grocery data from Montreal neighbourhoods as tool to combat unhealthy food choices and encourage healthier diets.

Global warming felt to deepest reaches of ocean

Research and Discovery

A new study by McGill researchers shows climate change has put a freshwater lid on the Antarctic ocean, trapping warm water in the deepest regions of the ocean. The new work may help explain a scientific mystery: the recent discovery that Antarctic Bottom Water, which fills the deepest layer of the world ocean, has been shrinking over the last few decades.

Biodiverse agriculture as part of a food-secure future

Research and Discovery

Is biodiverse agriculture an anachronism? Or is it a vital part of a food-secure future? Given the need to feed an estimated 2.4 billion more people by the year 2050, the drive toward large-scale, single-crop farming around the world may seem inexorable.

McGill HPV study: Does vaccinating one sexual partner also benefit the other?

Research and Discovery

A new study by McGill will examine whether vaccinating only one partner in a couple against the human papillomavirus (HPV) can help prevent transmission of HPV to the unvaccinated partner. The study aims to determine the efficacy of an HPV vaccine in reducing transmission of genital, anal, and oral HPV infection in unvaccinated sexual partners of vaccinated individuals.