CF drugs are costly but hope can be found in the pipeline

Research

Clapping on a child’s chest to release the disease’s telltale thick mucus is a long standing treatment for Cystic Fibrosis. It does help, but discoveries in biomedical research are now leading to the development of new therapeutics which can target the molecular defect.

Unlocking the mystery of hypothyroidism

Research

Central hypothyroidism is a condition whose underlying causes have long remained unknown. A recent study led by McGill researchers has begun to unlock the mystery for what appears to be the most common genetic cause of central hypothyroidism by providing, for the first time, an understanding of the underlying mechanism of the disorder.

Teaching practices play an important role in preventing bullying

Research

Classrooms that encourage competition between students may inadvertently be creating settings where bullying is more likely to take place. That’s one of the conclusions that can be drawn from work led by McGill researchers. But it’s only part of the story. One factor that was important, especially for boys, was the quality of the relationships they had with their teachers in the classroom.

New hope in the fight against superbugs

Research

Antibiotic resistance is a growing global health threat.  So much so that a 2014 study commissioned by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom predicted that, if the problem is left unchecked, in less than 35 years more people will die from antibiotic resistant superbugs than from cancer. But a discovery by McGill researchers could lead to the design of next-generation antibiotics.

Protecting life’s tangled ecological webs

Research

In a paper published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution, researchers from McGill and University of British Columbia have developed a new theory to understand how complex ecological networks will reorganize in the future.

New theory on how Earth’s crust was created

Research

Conventional theory holds that all of the early Earth’s crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity. Now, however, McGill earth scientists Don Baker and Kassandra Sofonio have published a theory with a novel twist: some of the chemical components of this material settled onto Earth’s early surface from the steamy atmosphere that prevailed at the time. The experimental findings could guide search for exoplanets that may harbor life.

Bright future for self-charging batteries

Research

New technology developed by Hydro-Québec and McGill could one day make battery chargers obsolete.

Smart wheelchair gives users more autonomy

Research

In the 1950s, Canadian inventor George Klein built the first electric wheelchair – considered one of the greatest inventions in the history of Canadian science and engineering. Now Computer Engineering professor Joëlle Pineau is working on advancing Klein’s work with the next generation of user-friendly wheelchairs.

When children see war as better than peace

Research

For most people, the end of a war offers relief, hope, and an end to violence. This may not be the case for children born of wartime rape, however, who often endure continued brutality in the post-war period.

Power to the people

Research

Without electricity not much gets done these days. That’s why McGill’s best Artificial Intelligence brains are making the electrical grid smarter and more responsive, to avoid outages and accommodate increasing input into the grid from solar and wind power.