Novel treatment for a form of childhood blindness unveiled

Headline News

An international research project, led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), reports that a new oral medication is showing significant progress in restoring vision to patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Until now, this inherited retinal disease that causes visual impairment ranging from reduced vision to complete blindness, has remained untreatable.

McGill receives $25 million for discovery research projects

Headline News

McGill will receive over $25 million from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) for studies ranging from the genomics of adaptation to environmental change, to defusing volcanic eruptions, to studies on robotic teamwork and collaboration.

Certain stories motivate children to be honest

Headline News

A moral story that praises a character’s honesty is more effective in getting young children to tell the truth than a story that emphasizes the negative repercussions of lying, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that stories such as “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” and “Pinocchio” may not be effective cautionary tales when it comes to inspiring honest behaviour in children.

International study yields important clues to the genetics of epilepsy

Headline News

An international team of researchers has discovered a significant genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy, the most common form of epilepsy. The new research, published in this week’s issue of EMBO Reports, implicates a mutation in the gene for a protein, known as cotransporter KCC2.

Roderick A. Macdonald (1948-2014)

Headline News

Professor Roderick A. Macdonald, F.R. Scott Professor of Constitutional and Public Law, passed away Friday, June 13 after a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 65. Daniel Jutras, Dean of the Faculty of Law and Wainwright Professor of Civil Law remembers Macdonald as “one of the most important scholars and thinkers in McGill University’s history.”

Goodman Gala raises $2.5 million for Cancer Centre

Headline News

The 3rd Goodman Cancer Research Gala, held on Sunday, June 1 in support of McGill’s Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, brought together 800 guests and raised $2.5 million to support the Centre and the groundbreaking efforts of its scientists to unravel the mysteries of cancer and translate discoveries into better patient care.

Mastering the art of diploma-cy

Headline News

Paperwork. Just the word makes some people feel like a modern-day Sisyphus, ridding their desk of a mountain of paper only to have it replaced by another. But for Enrolment Services’ Heidi Emami and Clara Spadafora, paperwork at this time of year – printing, processing and prepping thousands of diplomas for Convocation – is one of the most rewarding aspects of their respective jobs.

Polar obsession: National Geo photographer talks climate change, diving in sub-zero water and swimming with Antarctic predators

Headline News

Paul Nicklen is a world-renowned Canadian wildlife photographer best known for his 15 years of work for National Geographic magazine as a specialist in Arctic and Antarctic environments. He’s brought readers stories of face-to-face encounters with polar bears and leopard seals, all the while drawing attention to the dangers of climate change. Nicklen will be in Montreal this coming Wednesday, May 28, at the Centre Mont-Royal auditorium, to give a free public talk titled “Polar Obsessions” as part of the Genomes to Biomes conference.

Masi presents highlights of McGill’s budget for fiscal 2014-2015 to Senate

Headline News

In light of continued funding uncertainty, McGill must preserve what it has achieved over the last year, Provost Anthony C. Masi told Senate on April 23. His presentation was the last of three updates on McGill’s budget planning in the run-up to the Board of Governors’ April 29 final approval of the budget for fiscal 2014-2015 (FY2015).

Bird brains teach us about trial-and-error learning

Headline News

When you throw a wild pitch or sing a flat note, it could be that your basal ganglia made you do it. This area in the middle of the brain is involved in motor control and learning. And one reason for that errant toss or off-key note may be that your brain prompted you to vary your behaviour to help you learn, from trial-and-error, to perform better. But how does the brain do this, how does it cause you to vary your behaviour? Researcher Sarah Woolley says the songbirds may hold the answer.