Community Connections

MNI participates in the Friends of the MUHC Toonie Challenge The Friends of the MUHC Toonie Challenge is back for its fourth annual run, and this year Montreal schools have once again hopped on board to help raise funds for the McGill University Health Centre. So far this year’s Challenge has raised $5400, adding to […]

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News

May 2016 – Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month

Multiple sclerosis treatment and research has long been a focus at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. The Neuro introduced Canada’s first MS clinic and the clinic’s highly specialized staff employs the latest research data and treatment methods in a clinical atmosphere of innovation and progress. Learn more.

The Wounded Brain Healed – The Golden Age of the Montreal Neurological Institute, 1934-1984

“The Wounded Brain Healed ” by William Feindel and Richard Leblanc was recently published by McGill Queens University Press. The book, a labour of love began by Dr. William Feindel, who passed away in January 2014, would not have been completed without the dedication of Dr. Richard Leblanc, as well as numerous private donors and supporters. Learn more.

Researchers use optogenetics to produce pain relief by shutting off neurons with light

The potential of light as a non-invasive, highly-focused alternative to pain medication was made more apparent thanks to research conducted by Philippe Séguéla and colleagues at the MNI. Researchers bred mice with a light-sensitive trait in peripheral neurons that were known to be responsible for pain transmission. The mice were genetically modified so that these neurons, called Nav 1.8+ nociceptors, express proteins called opsins, which react to light, a process known as optogenetics. Learn more.
 
 

Brain responses found to originate from previously unknown source

Dr. Robert Zatorre and colleagues at the MNI have made an important discovery about the human auditory system and how to study it, findings that could lead to better testing and diagnosis of hearing-related disorders. Emily Coffey, a PhD student with Dr. Zatorre detected frequency-following responses (FFR) coming from a part of the brain not previously known to emit them. FFRs are neural signals generated in the brain when people hear sounds. Learn more.

Medical ethics and end-of-life care

As part of National Health Ethics Week Week in April, Dr. Eugene Bereza, Director of the Centre for Applied Ethics (CAE) of the MUHC, discussed medical ethics and end-of-life care in the media. Watch his interview on CTV news with Mutsumi Takahashi and read the article in the National Post.