Who is this person? Quiz

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by Philip Fine

This person helmed a very young McGill School of Nursing through the Great Depression and saw to its post-war expansion. She introduced a program of health education for student nurses at the Royal Victoria Hospital and helped bring about a national nursing curriculum in 1936.

Born in Saskatchewan in 1887, she earned her teaching certificate at 17 and, for the next 12 years, taught in both rural and urban Saskatchewan schools.

When nurses began to take a prominent role in the First World War, she traveled from the Prairies to New York to enrol in nursing school. She would graduate from St. Luke’s Hospital of Nursing and work in New York for three years. She returned to Saskatchewan, where she took on a key role in provincial nursing education.

In 1929, McGill came calling. She joined the nine-year-old McGill School for Graduate Nurses as Assistant Director and became Acting Director in 1934 and eventually Director until 1950.

In Barbara Logan Tunis’ In Caps and Gowns, one student from the early ’30s sings her praises: “During these years of great financial crisis, [this person’s] pioneer spirit carried the day in the classroom.”

She reportedly was an indefatigable teacher, preparing lectures into the early hours of the morning and even bringing in baked goods for her students. In 1946, she and colleague Mary Mathewson negotiated a $60,000 grant from the Kellogg Foundation. The School was able to hire new faculty and develop a new curriculum.

President of the Canadian Nurses Association, she represented the country on a number of international nursing councils and was widely published. She won numerous distinctions for her pioneering work on national nursing curriculum.

Teaching into her early 60s, her failing health forced her to retire in 1950. She died on March 19, 1955 in Victoria.

Today, her name graces a scholarship offered at McGill’s Ingram School of Nursing.

Highlight this line of text to reveal the answer: Marion Lindeburgh

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