How I use social media

Current
Dixon is co-founder, First Steps Fertility; CEO & Medical Director, Anova Fertility & Reproductive Health; and Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Toronto. She can be seen as a guest expert on lifestyle TV show, Cityline.

Dixon is co-founder, First Steps Fertility; CEO & Medical Director, Anova Fertility & Reproductive Health; and Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Toronto. She can be seen as a guest expert on lifestyle TV show, Cityline. Find Dixon on Twitter (@DrMarjorieDixon) and Facebook (Dr. Marjorie Dixon).

As shared with Sara Baron-Goodman

Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Specialist Marjorie Dixon, BSc, MDCM’97, whose groundbreaking IVF work has been featured in TIME, shares how (and why) she fits Twitter and Facebook into her busy schedule.

What social media accounts do you use and how frequently?

Facebook and Twitter. I use them several times a week, depending. But if I see an exciting bit of news or something significant happens in my field, I may write about several things in a day.

What function do your social media profiles have for you professionally versus personally?

Both are used professionally. Anyone who needs me privately knows how to get to me!

What are the pros and cons of connecting on social media in your field? The cons?

Pros: I am kept apprised of the most current news in my field through my feeds and it allows me to be very well informed (about the medical literature, new breakthroughs, worldwide events).

I no longer have to wait for journals to get published every month (though I still do read these hard copies— I look forward to them coming in the mail and thumbing through; old habits die hard).

I get current, to-the-minute info and then share it with followers.

The con is that my professional life is very busy, so this communicating happens in spits and spurts, depending on what extra commitments I might have in a week. It can be inconsistent.

Nowadays, I am on Twitter most often; it is very efficient and my posts can be brief.

What role does advocacy play in social media in the medical field?

It plays a huge role. I take my role as an advocate for all things women’s health very seriously. Knowledge is power and I realize that I am an educator of the masses through my social media feeds. When one trains medically, you end up wearing many hats: educator, scholar, advocate, manager, employer, professional, expert.

Social media allows me to maximize that multitask. Patients can follow and know that the information that I am giving them is selected, triaged and reliable. But patients aren’t the only ones who benefit. [There are also] trainees, nurses, lay people interested in fertility, [etc.]. It brings everyone together in one forum and gives me a broad audience and a huge voice in my communiyt.

I am not certain that I had a true appreciation for the reach that I would have when this relationship with social media began. I now see that it has served a critical dual purpose : not just keeping my followers informed, but social media is also a critical part of growing my knowledge base in my own field. I can feed my passion for what’s new in women’s health every single day!

 

 

 

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