SPOT legend Edith Aston-McCrimmon remembered with new bursary

Current
Aston-McCrimmon’s name also lives on at SPOT through an annual lecture series. Pictured: this year’s invited guest, Patrice (Tamar) Weiss, PhD’85, (centre) former Associate Professor at SPOT, who gave an entertaining and thought-provoking talk on rehabilitation technologies, with, clockwise from left, Patricia and Andrew Harper, Sarah Marshall, BSc(PT)’84, MSc’06, Director’s Academic Associate, and Annette Majnemer.

Aston-McCrimmon’s name also lives on at SPOT through an annual lecture series. Pictured: this year’s invited guest, Patrice (Tamar) Weiss, PhD’85, (centre) former Associate Professor at SPOT, who gave an entertaining and thought-provoking talk on rehabilitation technologies, with, clockwise from left, Patricia and Andrew Harper, Sarah Marshall, BSc(PT)’84, MSc’06, Director’s Academic Associate, and Annette Majnemer.

“She was an inspiration to our entire extended family, certainly to her nieces and nephews, especially to our generation,” says Patricia Harper, who, with brother, Andrew Harper, recently created the Edith Aston-McCrimmon Bursary in Physical and Occupational Therapy at the School of Physical & Occupational Therapy (SPOT), in memory of their great-aunt, Edith Aston-McCrimmon, DIP (P Th)’50, BSc(P&OT)’60, MSc(A)’80, and great-uncle, Donald McCrimmon.

“She and Donald were very good at helping you to expand your mind,” says Andrew.

He and Patricia credit Aston-McCrimmon, who was Director of Physical Therapy at the School from 1988 to 2001, with having taught them the importance of hard work, dedication, and service to others.

“She was an academic in an age when there weren’t a lot of women in academics and she did it with class and grace,” says Patricia.

A pioneer in the development of the physical therapy profession in Canada, Aston-McCrimmon taught thousands of students in her over 50-year career.

“She always had this natural empathy for students who weren’t as well off, who needed to get a leg up. Bursaries and access to education were very important to her,” says Andrew. Fittingly, the bursary is to be awarded on the basis of demonstrated financial need, as well as good academic standing.

Aston-McCrimmon’s name also lives on at SPOT through a lecture series. Every year since its founding in 2009, the Edith Aston-McCrimmon Lectureship has been attended by members of Aston-McCrimmon’s family. In 2014, Patricia and Andrew made the trip from Toronto to hear Dr. Gaétan Tardif speak on rehabilitation and Paralympians. It was, in part, this experience that inspired the siblings to create the bursary.

Edith Aston-McCrimmon (1929-2005) shared her love of education with the children in her extended family. / Photo courtesy of SPOT

Edith Aston-McCrimmon (1929-2005) shared her love of education with the children in her extended family. / Photo courtesy of SPOT

“Edith was a tenacious and forward-thinking leader but also a very generous person. It is very meaningful to us that her grandniece and grandnephew have chosen to support our students in need,” says Annette Majnemer, BSc(OT)’80, MSc’85, PhD’90, Director and Associate Dean.

The bursary will be awarded to its first recipient in 2016.

Be Sociable, Share!

Comments

2 Responses to “SPOT legend Edith Aston-McCrimmon remembered with new bursary
  1. Lynn Berrill Miller says:

    Miss Aston, as she was called in the early sixties when I took PNF and other PT courses from her , was so warm , funny and knowledgable in her teaching. She modeled professional attitudes and behavior that I used all my working career. I have been eternally grateful to her, and thought about her often while I was still practicing PT.

  2. Yen-Nhi Lam says:

    Indeed, she was a kind person who has made a difference in the lives of her students. I will never forget this exceptional educator.