Live 2018

A new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the MUHC in Montreal has revealed that pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis may be able to use certain RA drugs without possible increased health risks to their unborn babies. The research findings are published today in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology.
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Live 2018

Historically, our view of host defense against infection was that we must eliminate pathogens to eradicate disease. However, this perspective has recently been challenged as scientists have taken a lesson from plant biologists about an ancient strategy involving the ability to “tolerate” rather than “resist” infection to maintain health. This concept, referred to as “disease tolerance”, provides an opportunity to develop new strategies that mitigate the consequences of infection.
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Live 2018

A clinician/scientist at The Neuro played a major role in developing a drug that offers hope to people with two forms of multiple sclerosis, including one where no other effective drug existed. Neurologist Douglas Arnold helped determine the effectiveness of ocrelizumab, the first drug treatment approved for the treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis.
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Live 2018

Have you ever considered that working night shifts may, in the long run, have an impact on your health? A team of researchers from the McGill University affiliated Douglas Mental Health University Institute (DMHUI) has discovered that genes regulating important biological processes are incapable of adapting to new sleeping and eating patterns and that most of them stay tuned to their daytime biological clock rhythms.
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Live 2018

The discovery of a new mechanism involved in depression – and a way to target it with a drug as effective as classical antidepressants — provides new understanding of this illness and could pave the way for treatments with fewer side effects. In a study published in Nature Medicine, a team of scientists at McGill University and France’s Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale examined the biological and molecular mechanisms at play in neurons during treatment with a classical antidepressant.
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Live 2018

While the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has largely dropped from news headlines since the 1990s, at the end of 2016 there were 36.7 million people living with the infection, and of those only 53 per cent had access to treatment. A new study underscores the neurological consequences of exposure to HIV without antiretroviral therapy.
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Live 2018

In a study, recently published in Translational Psychiatry, a McGill-led team of scientists have been able to demonstrate long-lasting but subtle effects, at a genetic level, on the offspring of young mothers who took part in a nurse visitation program for vulnerable first time moms. This is the longest-running study of its kind, and the first to look at how positive psychosocial interventions can leave an epigenetic trace. 
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Live 2018

Gun violence has a long history in the U.S. Less understood is how homicide or suicide varies amongst black and white men across US states and how household gun ownership influences them. To explore this question, researchers from McGill University in Canada used data from death certificates to identify firearm homicides and suicides that took place in each US state between 2008 and 2016 and calculated how these differed among black and white men.
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Live 2018

For someone with Parkinson’s disease, the simple desire to grasp a glass of water can become an insurmountable task, made impossible by the tremors in their hand or arm. Finding strategies to improve these movement impairments is one of the major goals of rehabilitating people with Parkinson’s disease. At McGill University, Dr. Marc Roig, an assistant professor in the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, is studying the effects of using high-intensity exercise to stimulate the brain’s ability to learn and change with repeated experiences.
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Live 2018

Is peer review biased? Female health researchers who applied for grants from Canada’s major health research funder were funded less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, and characteristics of peer reviewers can also affect the result, found a study in Canadian Medical Association Journal
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