Live 2017

With cilia, until recently researchers have only been able to view the microtubule doublet from afar and, as a result, have believed that they are composed mostly of tubulins. Now, using the state-of-the-art Titan Krios microscope, researchers at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine were able, for the first time, to study the microtubule doublet in great detail. Their findings showed that this structure is much more complex than previously believed and were published recently in Nature Communications.
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Live 2017

The success of kidney transplant is dependent on the age and sex of both the donor and the recipient, according to research published today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
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Live 2017

Earlier this week, the CIHR announced $1.7 million in funding for 25 Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) research projects, including a $70,000 Catalyst Grant for the project, The Veterans Health Initiative. Led by Dr. Christina Wolfson of the Departments of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, the Veterans Health Initiative is based on the responses of some 4,500 veterans to a set of questions about past military service, the branch of the military in which they served, when the military service took place, and the length of time spent in the military.
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Live 2017

Even among non-dependent cocaine users, cues associated with consumption of the drug lead to dopamine release in an area of the brain thought to promote compulsive use, according to researchers at McGill University. The findings, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that people who consider themselves recreational users could be further along the road to addiction than they might have realized.
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Live 2017

In a field with few silver bullets, Dr. Kevin Petrecca has gotten pretty good at finding silver linings. The neurosurgeon and researcher at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital and Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University specializes in glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer with a dismal survival rate.
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Live 2017

Growing up as a bilingual child, Dr. Elin Thordardottir, Professor in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine, knows firsthand the challenges of learning multiple languages…and the advantages as well. Born in Iceland and having lived in France from the age of 8 to 14, she experienced some of the things she now studies for a living.
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Live 2017

A McGill biomedical engineer is designing a novel drug-testing platform for Cystic Fibrosis compounds by trying to solve a conundrum: How can you observe the natural reaction of a cell that is used in the natural habitat of the human body, when it is grown on the plastic surface of a well-plate?
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Live 2017

The quest for better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a powerful new tool at its disposal — the ability to artificially generate brain cells that have been shown to play an important role in the disease function. Using human skin cells, an international team including researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University has created a method to generate microglia, a type of brain cell involved in preserving the function of neural networks and responding to injury and disease.
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Live 2017

Clapping on a child’s chest to release the disease’s telltale thick mucus is a long standing treatment for Cystic Fibrosis (CF). It does help, but discoveries in biomedical research are now leading to the development of new therapeutics which can target the molecular defect.
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Live 2017

Dr. Sylvie Lambert, Assistant Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill Faculty of Medicine, is one of eleven women recently awarded a Canada Research Chair (CRC) at the University. Dr. Lambert was awarded a Tier 2 CRC in Sustainable Self-Management Support for Patients with Cancer and Their Family Caregivers. Tier 2 Chairs are awarded to exceptional emerging researchers, acknowledged by their peers as having the potential to lead in their field, and are valued at $100,000 annually for five years with one opportunity for renewal. The CRC program was created to enable Canadian universities to attract and retain established and emerging world-class researchers.
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