Live 2017

McGill University researchers have discovered a cellular mechanism that may contribute to the breakdown of communication between neurons in Alzheimer’s disease. Their study, published in Nature Communications, homes in on the role of RNA molecules involved in synaptic transmission –- the process through which neurons communicate with each other. In the brain tissue of Alzheimer’s patients, the RNAs that encode synaptic proteins are degraded more rapidly than in healthy brain cells, the researchers found.
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Live 2017

A new breast cancer study recently published in Cell Metabolism led by Drs. Julie St-Pierre and Peter Siegel of McGill University’s Goodman Cancer Research Centre, shows that breast cancer cells that spread to the lungs do not depend on one specific pathway or fuel source, but instead rely on the ability of cancer cells to engage multiple metabolic pathways.
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Live 2017

Benjamin Morillon, a researcher at the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University, designed a study based on the hypothesis that signals coming from the sensorimotor cortex could prepare the auditory cortex to process sound, and by doing so improve its ability to decipher complex sound flows like speech and music.
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Live 2017

A study led by researchers at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine offers a step forward in understanding the cellular state of BACE1 and identified an unexpected role of the enzyme. The results of the study were published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Live 2017

According to a study recently published in the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, the relationship between caffeine and Parkinson’s is still not fully understood.
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Live 2017

It is estimated that 30-40 per cent of people living with HIV do not know their HIV status, which can have a serious effect on the spread of the disease. One of the approaches developed to change this statistic, especially among populations at higher risk for infection and who lack access to care, is the development of HIV self-testing, which provides people with a HIV diagnostic test that they can use in private. Now, this screening strategy is getting a global push thanks to a major new partnership with The International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC).
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Live 2017

Researchers from the McGill Group for Suicide Studies, based at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry, have just published research in the American Journal of Psychiatry that suggests that the long-lasting effects of traumatic childhood experiences, like severe abuse, may be due to an impaired structure and functioning of cells in the anterior cingulate cortex. This is a part of the brain which plays an important role in the regulation of emotions and mood.
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Live 2017

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness month. Over the course of this 30-day period, over 1,700 Canadian men will be diagnosed with the disease, according to the Canadian Cancer Society, which also notes that prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting Canadian men (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers), and the third leading cause of their cancer-related deaths.
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Live 2017

McGill University researchers have discovered a mechanism through which mitochondria, the energy factory of our body’s cells, play a role in preventing cells from dying when the cells are deprived of nutrients – a finding that points to a potential target for next-generation cancer drugs. The research, published in Molecular Cell, builds on previous work by McGill professor Nahum Sonenberg, one of the senior authors of the new study.
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Live 2017

What if certain cancer patients could be spared invasive and uncomfortable biopsies? What if they could also be spared unnecessary chemo and radiation treatments? Looking at patients with oropharyngeal (throat) cancer, Dr. Jeffrey Chankowsky, associate professor of Diagnostic Radiology at McGill, and his multi-hospital team hope to use hidden data from imaging exams to map tumour texture and eventually determine what kind of tumour a patient has and how best to target treatment.
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