Live 2018

Back in the late 1950s a bright young student named Dorothy Thomas Edding, on her graduation from high school decided she wanted to study physiotherapy. As there was no program in her native Jamaica, she had no choice but to study abroad. Inspired by her father’s best friend who had attended McGill University, she chose to study there, and left the sunny island for snowy Montreal. Three decades later, she helped found the country’s first and only university-based School of Physical Therapy at the University of the West Indies, in Kingston, allowing aspiring physiotherapists to study and work closer to home.
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Live 2018

Humans have been attempting to teach computers to read their emotions since the 1990s, when MIT professor Rosalind W. Picard founded the field of affective computing. Almost 30 years later, affective computing technologies are starting to appear in the commercial mainstream. These include the Microsoft Emotion API, which analyzes facial expressions to detect a range of feelings, and Affectiva’s Emotion Speech API, which identifies emotion in pre-recorded audio segments. These technologies may have particular significance for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who often struggle with social interaction and communication. The potential is obvious: If smartphone apps could provide unobtrusive emotional cues in real time, they could be used by individuals with ASD to facilitate social interactions.
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Live 2018

Third-year McGill MDCM student Jessica Drury researched an important challenge facing health practitioners. It’s not one talked about during training, but it certainly affects a professional’s ability to best do her or his job: interruptions. Drury documented her findings in a paper called Do Not Disturb: Managing interruptions during patient visits, written for a second-year MDCM class called Observing Healthcare in Action (OHA). OHA is taught by Peter Nugus, a Professor at the Centre for Medical Education and in the Department of Family Medicine, who has conducted his own ethnographic research in emergency departments and various hospital and community settings in various countries.
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Live 2018

On February 13, 2018, RUIS (Réseau Universitaire Intégré de Santé) McGill Directors of Professional Services (DPS) had the pleasure of launching its first community of practice (CoP) on the topic of Clinical Pertinence. Martine Alfonso, president of the RUIS McGill and interim president and executive director of the McGill University health Centre (MUHC), as well as Dr. Samuel Benaroya, associate dean of McGill’s Faculty of Medicine, RUIS McGill coordinator and project sponsor, were present at the event.
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Live 2018

The Ingram School of Nursing (ISoN) has a strong record of commitment to teaching students about community nursing, particularly with more vulnerable communities. Within this optic, ISoN Faculty Lecturers and Global and Indigenous Health Nursing co-chairs Francoise Filion and Jodi Tuck would argue that the Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission had a profound effect on McGill University, the Faculty of Medicine, and on the ISoN. This is why, in large part, Filion and Tuck say the ISoN made a commitment to making Indigenous health an important feature of the undergraduate and graduate curriculum. To that end, Filion and Tuck have been working with Glenda Sandy, a proud Naskapi-Cree woman and Indigenous Nurse consultant to the ISoN, to develop ethically sound programs.
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Live 2018

The McGill University and Génome Québec Innovation Centre and the Canadian Centre for Computational Genomics will receive a total of $16.2 million in funding over five years through Genome Canada awards announced Feb. 21. The operational and technology-development grants will enable the centres to continue supporting the research community with high-level tools, technologies and services.
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Live 2018

February is Heart Month, a time to bring attention to the importance of cardiovascular health, and what we can do to reduce our risk of heart disease—also known as cardiovascular disease—which is an umbrella term for a group of conditions that affect the structure and functions of the heart. While some forms of heart disease are congenital (present at birth), the vast majority develop with age. According to Health Canada, cardiovascular disease affects approximately 2.4 million Canadian adults, and is the second leading cause of death in the country. The good news: many forms of heart disease can be prevented by living an active, healthy lifestyle, and McGill Nursing professor and researcher Andraea Van Hulst would argue that targeting childhood obesity is one of the best ways to prevent the development of this illness.
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Live 2018

On February 27 Dr. Mamta Gautam, a physician executive coach, author and internationally renowned speaker, will visit McGill to deliver two lectures, titled “Beyond Burnout to Resilience” from 9:35 to 10:25 a.m  in the Martin Amphitheatre (room 504) at the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building and from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m in the Osler Amphitheatre (room A6.105) at the Montreal General Hospital. Dr. Gautam sat down with us to answer four burning questions ahead of her visit.
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Live 2018

Modern neuroscience research can produce massive amounts of data, which researchers can use to find patterns revealing anything from the first physiological signs of Alzheimer’s disease to a new drug target that could stop neurodegeneration. However, this data must be stored, processed, and distributed effectively. To improve access to critical data, and to continue its policy of being a leader in open science, The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University has joined The Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform(CONP), a new data sharing partnership that will break down the barriers to collaboration, facilitating the distribution of data across the Canadian neuroscience community and beyond.
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Live 2018

“I was always interested in a surgical path within medicine because we get to intervene on patients in a meaningful way,” says Dr. Marco Mascarella, a third-year resident in the Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery at McGill University.  He recently participated in a two-day McGill Temporal Bone Course at the Steinberg Centre for Simulation and Interactive Learning, working with cadaveric specimens under close supervision to augment his knowledge and skills in microscopic ear surgery.
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