Live 2017

A person with a confident voice may do more than just make you think he or she is comfortable in their own skin. They could very well convince you that they are more trustworthy. A recently published study by postdoctoral researcher Xiaoming Jiang found that a confidently spoken phrase elicits a higher degree of trust than one spoken with doubt. A surprising aspect of the study, published in Human Brain Mapping, was that the actors who spoke in neutral tones were perceived as even more trustworthy than those affecting confident tones.
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Live 2017

A unique collaboration among Shriners Hospital for Children – Canada, CHU Sainte-Justine and McGill University has enabled researchers to identify genetic mutations involved in a rare disease that causes scoliosis and bone malformations. The findings, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, are likely to help doctors recognize the genetic disease, and could someday lead to therapies for the condition.
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Live 2017

Expectant and new parents often turn to the internet for parenting prep, but it turns out that dads often don’t seem to find the information they say they need about pregnancy, parenthood and routes to their own mental health and well-being. Now, a new study from a Canadian team led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) with funding from global men’s health charity the Movember Foundation highlights just what soon-to-be and new fathers want to see in a dad-focused website and how best to meet those needs.
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Live 2017

A new study led by researchers at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, published recently in the Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, explores the novel uses of ultrasound specifically with regard to plastic surgery. The authors hope that this paper will serve as a catalyst to create further discussion and exploration of how the technology can be integrated into practice.
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Live 2017

Individuals with type 2 diabetes may need insulin to achieve target blood glucose levels. As such, healthcare professionals and individuals living with diabetes may have questions about insulin initiation and reaching the right dosage. « Insulin makes it possible to lower the amount of glucose in the blood. Unfortunately, it is often initiated too late in the process, exposing the patient to the risk of complications associated with high blood glucose. It is thus important to have access to a simple and effective method to initiate and increase insulin doses. As part of our study, we compared the efficacy and safety of adjusting doses of Toujeo® according to Diabetes Canada’s clinical practice guidelines, » explains Dr. Jean-François Yale, Endocrinologist, Professor in the Department of Medicine of McGill University and member of the team of investigators who carried out the study.

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Live 2017

How can you improve the treatment of breast cancer? By determining how it develops in the first place. That is the subject of the latest study from Dr. Luke McCaffrey of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine, recently published in Genes and Development. His findings show the step-by-step process and characterize the events that take place during the transition from normal tissue to tumour, thus identifying the progression cells take as they evolve and morph.
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Live 2017

A recent study published in Nature Communications by Drs. Nassima Fodil and Philippe Gros at the McGill University Research Centre on Complex Traits, could have a significant impact on future treatments of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) – a cluster of ailments that includes Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis and that affects over a quarter million Canadians. The study found a gene, which was previously discovered as critical to sustain inflammation during cerebral malaria, is also important in patients afflicted with IBD.
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Live 2017

McGill University researchers have discovered a cellular mechanism that may contribute to the breakdown of communication between neurons in Alzheimer’s disease. Their study, published in Nature Communications, homes in on the role of RNA molecules involved in synaptic transmission –- the process through which neurons communicate with each other. In the brain tissue of Alzheimer’s patients, the RNAs that encode synaptic proteins are degraded more rapidly than in healthy brain cells, the researchers found.
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Live 2017

A new breast cancer study recently published in Cell Metabolism led by Drs. Julie St-Pierre and Peter Siegel of McGill University’s Goodman Cancer Research Centre, shows that breast cancer cells that spread to the lungs do not depend on one specific pathway or fuel source, but instead rely on the ability of cancer cells to engage multiple metabolic pathways.
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Live 2017

Benjamin Morillon, a researcher at the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University, designed a study based on the hypothesis that signals coming from the sensorimotor cortex could prepare the auditory cortex to process sound, and by doing so improve its ability to decipher complex sound flows like speech and music.
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