Dr. Mélanie Mondou appointed Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME)

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Dr. Mélanie Mondou to the position of Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME), Faculty of Medicine, McGill University. Dr. Mondou, who is Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, McGill University and Geriatrician, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), brings a wealth of relevant experience to her new role. Since 2016, she has been Clerkship Component Director for UGME, overseeing years 3 and 4 of the MDCM Program. Dr. Mondou has also designed and facilitated several interprofessional courses as part of the Office of Interprofessional Education, and is the UGME lead for interprofessional education.
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SAVE THE DATE – Next Faculty Council Meeting is Wednesday, February 28

The next Faculty Council meeting takes place Wednesday, February 28, 2018, at the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building (Palmer Amphitheatre), 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler at 4:30 p.m.
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REMINDER – Deadline is Feb. 28 – McGill “CLIC” Competition and Hakim Family Prize for Clinical Innovation

The McGill Clinical Innovation Competition (CLIC) and Hakim Family Innovation Prize recognize McGill Faculty members, including learners and graduates, who conceive and develop novel ideas that aim to improve health outcomes, access for patients, or health care effectiveness or efficiency, locally or globally. Proposals are screened, and finalists are selected and invited to “pitch” their idea during the CLIC event.
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January – February 2018

Med Events provides information on a range of events taking place across the Faculty of Medicine community that may be of interest to academic and support staff, as well as to students and residents.
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Registration for Focus Groups

This is a reminder that registration opened at 9 a.m. today for the five focus group meetings we’ve organized to help you connect with the Principal’s Task Force on Respect and Inclusion in Campus Life. Spaces, available on a first-come, first-served basis, are limited to 20 per group (with 15 spaces reserved in each for students) to ensure the groups can engage in frank, meaningful communication behind closed doors.
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MIMM Bites – February 2018

MIMM Bites newsletter provides news and announcements of interest to the faculty and support staff members, as well as to students and alumni members.
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Lady Davis Institute Research Newsletter – January 2018

We are pleased to announce that the Lady Davis Institute Research Newsletter for January 2018 is now available online!
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Giving back to her country: the McGill prof who made a substantial contribution to physiotherapy in her native land

Back in the late 1950s a bright young student named Dorothy Thomas Edding, on her graduation from high school decided she wanted to study physiotherapy. As there was no program in her native Jamaica, she had no choice but to study abroad. Inspired by her father’s best friend who had attended McGill University, she chose to study there, and left the sunny island for snowy Montreal. Three decades later, she helped found the country’s first and only university-based School of Physical Therapy at the University of the West Indies, in Kingston, allowing aspiring physiotherapists to study and work closer to home.
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How we can design the music of our emotions

Humans have been attempting to teach computers to read their emotions since the 1990s, when MIT professor Rosalind W. Picard founded the field of affective computing. Almost 30 years later, affective computing technologies are starting to appear in the commercial mainstream. These include the Microsoft Emotion API, which analyzes facial expressions to detect a range of feelings, and Affectiva’s Emotion Speech API, which identifies emotion in pre-recorded audio segments. These technologies may have particular significance for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who often struggle with social interaction and communication. The potential is obvious: If smartphone apps could provide unobtrusive emotional cues in real time, they could be used by individuals with ASD to facilitate social interactions.
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National study to shed light on aging

Imagine getting a phone call asking if you’d like to take part in a study … for the next 20 years. It’s a pitch that makes telemarketing look like child’s play. So no wonder Christina Wolfson, BSc’76, MSc’78, PhD’85, a professor in the Faculty of Medicine, says that the recruitment of research participants was probably the most stressful step in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). After all, it meant rounding up 50,000 people across Canada from 45 to 85 years old. Now well underway — and its initial data already the focus of follow-up research projects – CLSA is the largest study of its kind ever undertaken in Canada. It aims to find ways to help people “live long and live well,” and gain insight into why some fare better than others in the aging process.
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Products derived from plants offer potential as dual-targeting agents for experimental cerebral malaria

A recent study by researchers at McGill University conducted as a collaboration between the labs of Dr. Philippe Gros, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Vice-Dean, Life Science, and Dr. Jerry Pelletier, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry, shows that rocaglates – a class of naturally-derived products from plants of the Aglaia species – effectively block blood-stage parasite replication in several mouse models as well as in infected human red blood cells. The research highlights the strong potential of this class of compounds to be used for therapeutic treatment of complicated malaria cases in humans.
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McGill resident among 2018 Royal College Fellowship recipients

Dr. Alexander Winkler-Schwartz a fourth-year neurosurgical resident and a PhD candidate in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience at McGill University is one of three 2018 recipients of the Robert Maudsley Fellowship for Studies in Medical Education from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The fellowship helps specialists acquire knowledge and skills to develop educational programs, evaluation methods and research applicable to medical education. Congratulations Dr. Winkler-Schwartz!
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Najafabadi, Trenholm named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellows

Hamed Najafabadi, an assistant professor in McGill’s Department of Human Genetics, and Stuart Trenholm, assistant professor at the Montreal Neurological Institute, have been selected as 2018 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellows – a coveted distinction awarded to highly promising early-career scientists from the United States and Canada.
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Raising awareness of rare diseases

Defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 people, a legion of nearly 7000 identified rare diseases combine to affect tens of millions of people across the globe. While the prevalence of each of these individual diseases may be rare – hence the moniker – together they are quite common, with 1 in 12 Canadians suffering from a rare disease. “We all likely know someone who suffers from a rare disease,” says Jessie Kulaga-Yoskovitz, a second-year McGill medical student and the President and Founder of the McGill MSS Rare Disease Interest Group (rareDIG), one of the first student groups focused on this topic in Canada. On February 28, people around the world will take part in activities in more than 80 countries that aim to raise awareness of rare diseases. Inspired by TED talks, McGill rareDIG has put together an event open to the public that will feature idea-focused and passionate talks presented in a way that makes them accessible to the average person. 
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