Volume 6, Number 1

Alzheimer’s disease may have you long before you know that you’ve got it: By the time you’ve got symptoms, the disease is (for now) unstoppable. But Dr. John Breitner and researchers at the new Centre for Studies on the Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease are learning how to trace the progress of the disease in people who are not yet symptomatic — opening the door to early therapeutic interventions that might save millions of people from the creeping fog of dementia.
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Volume 6, Number 1

The longer you live, the greater the chance you’ll develop Alzheimer’s disease. By some researchers’ estimates, up to two-thirds of people in their nineties will show AD symptoms. But, even if the disease is an inevitable byproduct of aging (and the jury is still out on that one), it doesn’t mean that its primary symptom — dementia — can’t be kept in check.
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Volume 6, Number 1

The McConnell Brain Imaging Centre’s ACE NeuroImaging Laboratory and the Montreal Consortium for Brain Imaging Research are getting a clearer picture (literally) of what Alzheimer’s disease does to our brains.
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Volume 6, Number 1

Persistence can pay off. Andréa LeBlanc has found what may be a crucial key for X decoding Alzheimer’s disease (where no one was even looking).
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Volume 6, Number 1

Interdisciplinary research across McGill — including the Bloomfield Centre for Research in Aging, the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and the Centre for Research on Language, Mind and Brain—is exploring how language works… or doesn’t.
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