Volume 6, Number 1

McGill biochemistry professor J.B. Collip was searching for new sex hormones. He enlisted Hans Selye, a 29-year-old Austro-Hungarian post-doc, to inject lab rats with bovine ovary extracts, then look for changes to their sex organs. What Selye observed, however, weren’t the expected changes.
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Volume 5, Number 2

Vilhjalmur Stefansson and his Canadian Arctic Expedition (CAE) crew were poised to venture onto the frozen Beaufort Sea in March 1914. Problems, however, abounded. With food running low, his men were on the verge of mutiny. Stefansson was suffering from debilitating hemorrhoids, an affliction he tried to hide lest he lose even more of his crew’s confidence. To top it all off, his navigation equipment was faulty. Then J.J. O’Neill came to the rescue, at least in part.


Volume 4, Number 2

In 1969, nursing research in Canada was so young that it didn’t have its own scholarly journal. Moyra F. Allen, director of the graduate program at McGill’s School of Nursing, took issue with this omission—so she filled the gap with a trailblazing series called Nursing Papers.

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Volume 1, Number 2

McGill Research Facts Turning Points 1901 Ernest Rutherford’s groundbreaking work on the nature of radioactivity may have been conducted in one of the best labs in the world, but his work was so far out on the edge that the Professor of Experimental Physics at McGill from 1898 until 1907 found he often had to [...]


Volume 2, Number 1

Known as HM, the man standing before Dr. Brenda Milner was a mystery to the young scientist—and to himself. He could remember events from before undergoing brain surgery—a bilateral medial temporal lobe resection to remedy his epilepsy—but was now unable to form new memories. Told his doctor’s name, HM would forget it as soon as [...]


Volume 2, Number 1

Patenting new discoveries is a crucial step in the real-world application of academic research. Patents give McGill-affiliated companies the exclusive right to bring fresh ideas to the open market, an invaluable contribution to Canada’s economic and technological growth. According to the Association of University Technology Managers’ most recent U.S. Licensing Survey (for the fiscal year [...]


Volume 2, Number 1

The Office for Undergraduate Research in Science (OURS), launched in September 2005, aims to establish active research as a cornerstone of undergraduate education, strengthening student understanding of the process and products of scholarship through first-hand experience. OURS’ annual Undergraduate Research Conference showcases the results of recent student research, and its popular “Soup and Science” lunch [...]


Volume 1, Number 1

Gaining Brains After years of stories about how Canada’s best and brightest were being lured out of the country, the tide is turning. McGill is helping reverse the brain drain with a 10-year recruitment plan to attract 1,000 professors in strategic areas, thanks in part to programs like the federal government’s Canada Research Chairs. Of [...]


Volume 1, Number 2

Known as HM, the man standing before Dr. Brenda Milner was a mystery to the young scientist—and to himself. He could remember events from before undergoing brain surgery—a bilateral medial temporal lobe resection to remedy his epilepsy—but was now unable to form new memories. Told his doctor’s name, HM would forget it as soon as he was distracted by new stimuli.


Volume 4, Number 1

Following an international agreement at the 1884 Meridian Conference in Washington, D.C., to adopt a system of 24 global time zones, Canadians began setting their watches to McGill time. The McGill Observatory sent the official time signal by telegraph to railways and harbours nationwide and to such far-flung locales as Bermuda, Jamaica, the Azores and even some South Pacific islands.